Tributes to PSNI officer who died after falling from horse during hunt

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first_imgTragic day today as lost a great friend in a freak hunting accident. Claire Lowe(Millhouse) was really a amazing person and will be dearly missed by us all. Short URL Today, Superintendent Sean Wright paid tribute to her.“Claire was an experienced and professional police officer with six years’ service,” he said.“Claire was in the prime of her life. We all knew of her love for horses and for her sport but we also knew her for being a committed police officer who found challenge and reward in serving the local community and in keeping people safe throughout the Lisburn and Castlereagh District.Claire’s untimely death has caused shock amongst her friends and colleagues across PSNI. She will be very much missed by all of us and her loss will be deeply felt for a long time to come.“Our thoughts are with Claire’s family and friends at this tragic and difficult time.”Read: Man (19) dies after car hits wall in Cork By Sinead O’Carroll Thursday 27 Oct 2016, 1:58 PM Oct 27th 2016, 1:58 PM Share48 Tweet Email http://jrnl.ie/3049377 File photo Image: Niall Carson/PA Wirecenter_img A PSNI OFFICER has been remembered for her love of horses and sport after her tragic death during a hunt in Northern Ireland.Constable Claire Lowe died after falling from a horse in what has been described as a “freak hunting accident” in Ballygowan yesterday.A friend wrote on Facebook of the 39-year-old woman: Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 36 Comments 12,761 Views Image: Niall Carson/PA Wire Tributes to PSNI officer who died after falling from horse during hunt “Claire was in the prime of her life,” her Superintendent said today. File photolast_img read more

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Ukip members vote to remove scandalhit leader Henry Bolton

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first_img Share25 Tweet Email Image: Gareth Fuller via PA Images http://jrnl.ie/3857752 Saturday 17 Feb 2018, 5:16 PM By Hayley Halpin Short URL Feb 17th 2018, 5:16 PM Henry Boltoncenter_img Henry Bolton Image: Gareth Fuller via PA Images Ukip members vote to remove scandal-hit leader Henry Bolton Members backed a motion of no confidence by 867 votes (63%) to 500 (37%). 21 Comments MEMBERS OF BRITAIN’S Ukip party have voted to remove party leader Henry Bolton from his role following controversy over racist messages sent by his partner.At the party’s Extraordinary General Meeting today in Birmingham, members backed a motion of no confidence by 867 votes (63%) to 500 (37%).Bolton, aged 54, came under fire in early January after it emerged that his girlfriend allegedly made racist remarks about Prince Harry’s fiancée Meghan Markle.25-year-old Jo Marney is said to have written texts saying that “black American” Markle would “taint the royal family”, and her marriage to Prince Harry would pave the way for a “black king”.Marney apologised for the comments, saying they were “unnecessary” and “reckless”.Bolton, who was elected party leader less than five months ago, and Marney separated after the texts were made public.On 21 January, Ukip’s national executive committee unanimously backed a vote of no confidence in Bolton at an emergency meeting.However, Bolton vowed to continue as party leader, despite the no-confidence vote. The motion was today taken to Ukip members to decide whether they accept or reject the committee’s stance.Two senior members of Ukip, deputy leader Margot Parker and the party’s immigration spokesman John Bickley, quit the party after Bolton refused to step aside last month.Read: Ukip in turmoil as two top figures quit party after leader refuses to step downMore: Ukip leader loses no-confidence vote after row over comments made by ex-girlfriend 7,260 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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The doorbell rings at 4am Its a taxi with Joe Royle We

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first_img Short URL http://the42.ie/3853802 Share229 Tweet Email2 ‘The doorbell rings at 4am. It’s a taxi with Joe Royle… We ended up having rasher sandwiches in the kitchen’ As The42′s League of Ireland legends series is renewed for a second season, we chat to former Dundalk, Bohemians and Shamrock Rovers star Terry Eviston. (L-R) Rovers’ Leonard Curtis and Terry Eviston celebrate a goal. Image: Lorraine O’Sullivan/INPHO (L-R) Rovers’ Leonard Curtis and Terry Eviston celebrate a goal. Image: Lorraine O’Sullivan/INPHO Sunday 18 Feb 2018, 9:30 PM By Paul Fennessy 24 Comments Follow us: the42.ie 32,787 Views Feb 18th 2018, 9:31 PM Updated at 09.14TERRY EVISTON CONSISTENTLY stood out on the football pitch — but it wasn’t always for his footballing ability.The former Dundalk and Shamrock Rovers player remembers a game early in his career with Bohemians.“I was out of college and I had a beard and a bit of an afro head on me, but [the late RTÉ Radio football commentator] Philip Green referred to me as the ‘Karl Marx of the left-wing’. Phil was great for those comments, he really was.”To be fair, Eviston had the talent to back up his somewhat flamboyant appearance back in the day. His feats over the course of a 23-year career as a player in the League of Ireland include four league titles (two apiece with Dundalk and Shamrock Rovers), three League of Ireland Cups, one FAI Cup, one President’s Cup, two Leinster Senior Cups and the Soccer Writers’ Personality of the Year award.Yet despite the countless achievements, rather than the trophies, it is the stories and the craic over the course of his time in football that he gets most animated about during our discussion.Read more League of Ireland legend interviews here>And from going down to play Cork as a youngster and being warned “I’ll break your fucking leg boy” by a no-nonsense defender to “sporting this ridiculous moustache” while appearing next to Zig and Zag on ‘The Den’ (a much-missed long-running RTÉ children’s television show), Eviston certainly has plenty of stories to tell. Eviston pictured during his Shamrock Rovers days. Source: © Billy SticklandINPHO1. Learning his tradeThe Dubliner’s love affair with the beautiful game started in the 1960s and continues to this day. With a sparse attendance watching on, he would line out as a youngster in Killester Park, representing ”the top of the road” in their regular games against “the bottom of the road”.“Things got really hot and heavy,” Eviston reflects of those fiercely contested matches in his estate, as he begins an hour-long chat with The42.“My earliest memories would be there, and also back gardens. A friend of mine had the nets up in his back garden.Kids are spoiled today with PlayStations and all that kind of stuff. For us, it was the net — hitting the ball into the net was something else.”Eviston’s first experience of organised football was with St Martin’s Boys, who played in Donnycarney in Maypark, or ‘The Jungle,’ as it was more commonly known.“Only recently, two of the stalwarts, Paddy Kerr and Johnny Chambers, passed away,” he says.“When you look back at the schoolboy coaches giving up their time — without them, there wouldn’t have been anything.” Eviston came through the ranks at Home Farm along with future Shamrock Rovers star and current Ireland U21 boss Noel King.2. A home away from homeAged 17, Eviston signed with Home Farm — then a League of Ireland side — under Charlie Walker, alongside other youngsters who went on to have good careers in the game, including Harry McCue and Noel King.“Noel got on the bench for the famous Home Farm cup final win over Shels [in 1975],” he adds.Charlie was a larger-than-life character. He was a great man manager. At that particular time, he was great for me. I opted out, as I was doing my Leaving Cert as a youth in Home Farm. He was constantly phoning and when you think back, it was a nice little antidote to study, taking it all out on the football. So I ended going back to them after Christmas having left the youth team.“So Charlie was a great influence, alright. He brought a whole new professionalism to things — I think he was the first guy to bring cones around [to training].”It was the start of a lengthy stint in the League of Ireland and Eviston could have progressed to an even higher level had things worked out differently. The winger caught the eye when playing a friendly against a Jock Stein-managed Scotland side “around ’79″. Burnley, who had recently been relegated to England’s second tier, were interested in signing him — info Eviston himself didn’t discover until years later.On the possibility of getting a big move to England, he continues: “I was studying to be a teacher at the time, but playing football at the highest level in Ireland was a dream for me.“You never lost sight of that — you were doing something that you really loved doing. It wasn’t as professional as it is today, but certainly we had a great sprinkling of decent talent and characters in the game. It’s something that I have absolutely no regrets about being involved in. I think there’s a lot of luck involved if you get away as well. There’s a much bigger net being cast now, so anybody who is half-decent gets over and has a go, has a trial. In my day, it wasn’t as easy to get over.” Eviston came up against future Ireland international Paul McGrath during the latter’s time at St Patrick’s Athletic. Source: Billy Stickland/INPHO3. A special talentDespite staying in Ireland, Eviston did come up against a couple of players who would go on to become world-class stars in the game. In the early 1980s, he faced a young Paul McGrath, who spent a year at St Patrick’s Athletic, before moving to Manchester United, with the defender going on to win 83 caps for Ireland and becoming a legend of the game.“[McGrath] was unusual in the sense that Charlie had picked him up from junior football. I think he was playing out in Dún Laoghaire. It just happened for Paul, and it was great to see him [do well], because I remember playing against him many a time.“He didn’t have to go over [to England] when he was 14 or 15 — that seemed to be the trend in the past. He could learn his trade here and then get over.“Kevin Moran was much the same [in terms of what he went on to achieve], he would have been playing with UCD. He was a strong lad, but you never would have imagined him playing at the level he did play.Paul was a bit more Mercedes-like. He was something. He was different, I think he proved that. He was just a natural. He knew where to go, he knew when to run with the ball, he knew how to tackle, he was just all-round [brilliance]. I think he did it intuitively and didn’t need a lot of coaching. He was just very good at what he did.”And McGrath wasn’t the only future Irish legend Eviston came across over the course if his career.“I remember playing against [Roy Keane], when he had signed for Forest, I was with Dundalk at the time.“But I remember talking to him at a PFAI do a while back. He was sharp as a razor, because he pinpointed the year we played them at Oriel Park. [Brian] Clough was the manager.“He was your box-to-box midfielder, he was young, and just had sheer physical presence. At one stage, he went by me, making a run from deep in midfield. The only way I could explain it was it was as if this plane had gone by and I was caught in the draft of it — it was just the sheer energy of it.“So I wasn’t surprised how well he did at Forest after that. It was something to behold. I just felt: ‘Jeez, I have a long way to go to match his physical strength.’“He was powerful. He put on the bulk afterwards, but I’d say he’d been with Forest maybe a year or two at this stage.” Eviston came up against some tough defenders in his time, including Shamrock Rovers’ Dermot Keely. Source: INPHO4. The school of hard knocksAfter three years with Home Farm, a 21-year-old Eviston joined Bohemians, who were managed by Billy Young at the time. And it was during his five years at Dalymount Park that the winger began to really establish himself as one of the top players in the country, scoring 31 league goals in over 100 appearances overall.“As regards enjoyment factor and playing, my first game with Bohs was down in Cork. It was the first league game. They had a back four of Martin Sheehan, he was like someone who was lured down in the mountains, there was a red beard on him, and Noel O’Mahony, God rest him. He was later Cork manager. The two of them were tough as nails.“Then you had the two full-backs, John Herrick and John Brohan, a tougher back four you could not meet, and I was thrown in as a youngster.The intimidation was awful. It was very tough. ‘I’ll break your fucking leg boy.’ You’re thinking: ‘Jaysus, where’s he coming from?’ It was nearly like playing against Dermot Keely, you always looked over your shoulder to see: ‘Where the fuck is he?’ You know?“Then you had the Dundalk team, their back four was superb as well. It was Paddy Dunning, Tommy McConville, Dermot Keely and Martin Lawlor, you didn’t mess around with them.“I nearly joined Dundalk [after Home Farm], but I remember talking to [the manager] Jim McLaughlin in the Skylon [Hotel] in Drumcondra. I said: ‘It would be easier to train in Dublin than going up to Dundalk.’ Anyway, these are the decisions you make in life.”Eviston instead moved to a Bohs side that had just won the league title, but also subsequently lost key players, including Pat Byrne and Fran O’Brien, both of whom would represent Ireland at senior level.Young’s up-and-coming team frequently challenged for honours. They finished in the top three twice during Eviston’s time there, while despite only being in his mid-20s, the Dubliner was made captain near the end of the stint. His last game was the 1983 FAI Cup final at Dalymount Park, which they lost 2-1 against Sligo Rovers, and there is a lingering sense of disappointment that for all the side’s talent, Eviston claimed just a single major trophy, the League of Ireland Cup, during his time there. Source: retroloi/YouTube5. Across the great divideIn 1983, Eviston decided to make the move to fellow Dublin side and bitter rivals of Bohs, Shamrock Rovers. The transfer was not received well by supporters, to put it mildly. And in hindsight, he admits to struggling to cope with the pressure brought on by this controversial switch.A certain anxiety, coupled with injury problems, meant Rovers never saw the best of him during his first stint there. He still managed to win a league title, the first of his career, as Jim McLaughlin’s side began their famous ‘four-in-a-row’. After a year and a half at Glenmalure Park though, he was “bombed” out. So any success he enjoyed at Milltown was bittersweet and short-lived.“Going from Bohs to Rovers was just like sacrilege,” he says. “You just didn’t do it. It was all a bit much for me.“Jim McLaughlin had come down from Dundalk, which was a huge move for him. He signed all the best players in the country basically.“I was injured most of the time. There was one match to win the league, it was in Glenmalure, I had gone over on my ankle a couple of weeks beforehand. At this stage, I had so many injuries that McLaughlin thought I was just faking it.He said: ‘How are you fixed?’ I said: ‘It’s still very sore.’ He said ‘just take that’. It was actually a protein tablet, Vivioptal. It went out years ago, as it was a pain-killer. I knew what it was as well.“I got the league medal and we were beaten in the cup final that year [by UCD] as well. At that stage, the writing was on the wall for me — it wasn’t really happening.“I think McLaughlin had regretted buying me. I had gone for a fairly decent fee across the divide from the north side to the south side so to speak — that was a huge burden at the time.“I was 25, I should have been well able to cope with it. But it was pretty hard going, especially when you came up against both sets of supporters — Bohs for leaving them and Rovers when I was there, because I was coming from Bohs.“If you’re in any way brittle, which I was at that stage, it kind of gets to you. Psychologically, it got to me a little bit. I never realised my potential there, whereas I should have.”He continues: “If someone had just grabbed me by the scruff of the neck the first time at Rovers and said: ‘Will you bloody well relax? Go out for a few pints before the game if that’s what you need to do, you’re there to go out and enjoy yourself.’“So, despite the first [league winners’ medal], I don’t really consider myself as part of that four-in-a-row.” Shamrock Rovers manager Jim McLaughlin celebrates with Paul Doolin. Source: Billy Stickland/INPHO6. One step back, two steps forwardFollowing the Rovers debacle, Eviston went “back to basics” and joined Athlone, where he linked up with Turlough O’Connor, a League of Ireland legend in his own right, with the manager going on to have a significant influence on the out-of-sorts winger’s career.At St Mel’s Park, tactical instructions were limited, and O’Connor gave Eviston “free rein,” which enabled him to thrive.“I suppose Athlone really revived my career from being down in the pits,” he says.Two years later, Eviston followed O’Connor to Dundalk, where he would spend seven years and reach his footballing peak in the process. Despite being almost 30 by the time he joined the Lilywhites, Eviston was a late developer and it was only around this point that he really began to fulfil his potential.Unlike during the failed Rovers stint, the new recruit took little time to make an impression at Oriel Park. When the team won the double in the 1987-88 season, he was named the Soccer Writers’ Personality of the Year, in addition to claiming the league title again in 1991 and two League of Ireland Cups (1987 and 1990). He scored 40 goals overall for the club, which was helped by the fact that as he grew older, Eviston tended to gravitate from the wing to a centre-forward position.I suppose when you’re younger, you have all sorts of things going on, you’re getting married and having kids, so you just get a grounding and appreciation of what matters [once you get older]. “You grow up and you just treasure every moment of it. But certainly, the medals for Dundalk, I earned them and was part of them.“I was always a winger [before] and I just went on a run of goals. Any striker will tell you need to be scoring goals and if you have a barren period and it lasts any length of time, you start to question yourself.“I don’t know what it was, [I suppose] it was the release of being back playing again with a freedom… I was free to roam around up front and just do what I pleased basically.“When we won the double, it was as close as you’ll get to playing in England, going on an open-top bus, the crowds in the streets of Dundalk, it was just phenomenal and something you’ll never forget being a part of.” Source: MLSZ TV Archív/YouTube7. European dreamIn addition to the domestic success, there were a couple of memorable Europe nights, with the Lilywhites taking on some top sides at the time, including Ajax, Red Star Belgrade and Honved FC.“I remember with Dundalk, we played Kispest Honved and there was a guy called Ricky McEvoy playing for us, he played for Rovers as well.“We were underdogs and lo and behold, we break away and Ricky unleashes a volley and scores. We’re all looking at each other and saying: ‘What’s after happening here? We’re winning the game.’ It was backs to the wall, at that stage, I was still playing on the left, and I don’t think we got outside our 18-yard box — we were defending for our lives.We came in at half-time and I’ll never forget the expression on everybody’s face, a fearful look of: ‘Oh shit, how are we 1-0 up?’ It was always backs to the wall in European games.”Given that even the top League of Ireland clubs were invariably part-time during that era, they unsurprisingly struggled more often than not in these extremely challenging circumstances.“I was at [former St Pat’s and Dundalk player] Joey Malone’s 60th there recently and [ex-Dundalk and Shamrock Rovers goalkeeper] Alan O’Neill was talking about [Paul Newe] passing the ball back to him and he actually scored an own goal. It was around 30 yards out, it sailed over Alan’s head. Source: Ajax Archief/YouTube“Ajax actually beat us 2-0 at home. Frank Stapleton was playing that time. I think he actually scored as well. They beat us 4-0 away. Frank Rijkaard was playing as well. Those nights were brilliant, a packed Oriel Park was great.“Then, for the pre-season friendlies, you had brilliant games as well. We had a game against Liverpool. At this stage, I was 35, 36, I didn’t think I’d be involved at all. It was a League of Ireland selection against Liverpool. I remember ‘Razor’ [Neil] Ruddock was coming on and he said: ‘How you doing, old guy?’“Pat Morley actually put us ahead in that game. I was on the bench. I came on for a cameo in the last 20 minutes. They equalised unfortunately. Graeme Souness was manager then, it would have been early ’90s.” Source: killianM2/YouTube8. Superstar soccerOther memorable occasions abroad included trips to far-flung places as part of a League of Ireland XI. In April 1980, Eviston was in the side that faced Argentina at River Plate Stadium. A young 19-year-old lad by the name of Diego Maradona scored the winner. A little over a year later, the Irish winger was part of the travelling party to take on Brazil in Maceió.The Argentina game, in particular, stands out in the memory. After all, Eviston and co were up against a team that had won the World Cup less than two years previously and would do so again in six years’ time.“It’s clichéd at this stage, but we did extremely well,” he says. “We were only beaten 1-0 and [Maradona] scored the goal. I remember walking through the posh district in Buenos Aires the following day. The match was on telly and we were all outside looking in at the match.“[Former Limerick City player] Pat Nolan was marking Maradona — I think Pat still has his jersey. I got the number four jersey, it was [Jorge] Olguin, he was the full-back at the ’78 World Cup.Those trips were unique. I was teaching then at that stage. There were taxi drivers, shopkeepers, postmen [in the team]. We were just part-time. It was a marvellous opportunity for us to pit ourselves against these guys who were superstars.“I suppose that’s one thing I’ll always miss — that buzz of your name being on a travelling party to go out and play these games. It was halcyon days for League of Ireland trips, brilliant trips.“The Brazil game was close enough [to the Argentina trip]. We were hammered 6-0 and Zico got four goals. That was a week-long trip for one match. We travelled all the time. I think we got one overnight stay.“So that made it for League of Ireland players. We were training Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday morning, match on Sunday — that was our routine.“We didn’t really look further than that. We were happy to do it. You got the few bob, it helped me when I was getting married, it kept things going really, a little bit of an extension to the side of the house or something, it just kept you afloat.“The ’80s were very difficult times for mortgages and stuff like that — the interest rates were 14 or 15%, we hadn’t got a bean. That added a different dimension to it, you know? Getting your few bob and it was a few bob, it wasn’t huge.”And did his employers at the school approve of these frequent away trips?“It was awkward. I had to get special leave. I wouldn’t get paid [by the school] for it, but we got expenses from the FAI or whatever. But I have to say that I was never stopped from going.“Some lads went down to New Zealand, I missed out on that one — I had cracked my ribs [playing in a game].“But we were all over the place — there was another one to Malaysia, it was a great time. I don’t think the lads now have the same opportunity.“The preparation wouldn’t have been what you have now. It was more relaxed — that’s probably a euphemism.” Source: sp1873/YouTube9. Like a fine wineAfter the hugely successful spell at Dundalk, Eviston went some way towards making up for his disappointing stint at Rovers on his return there.Aged 36, at a time when most players would be at least considering retirement, Eviston managed to enjoy some of the best moments of his career. In three years with the Hoops, the veteran star made 60 appearances, including a significant contribution to their league title win, 10 years on from first triumphing in the top flight with the Dublin side.Under the management of a former Ireland international, the late Ray Treacy, Eviston enjoyed a rather spectacular footballing Indian summer playing in the RDS and featuring alongside the talented likes of Stephen Geoghegan, Paul Osam and John Toal.“That was a real bonus, because when I was in my 30s, you could see the end coming.We had a great team. We had a mixture of experience and younger fellas. Alan [O’Neill] in goal and John Toal in the middle of the park, Gheogho up front, myself knocking in goals, whereas my first time at Rovers, I couldn’t kick snow off a rope.“To come back at 36, to be such a part of the team that won the league was fantastic.”And it didn’t even end there. After leaving Rovers in 1996, he would play for two more seasons, with Athlone and Cobh Ramblers respectively, before eventually hanging up his boots at the age of 40.“I actually finished my playing days in Cobh, believe it or not. People were saying: ‘What in God’s name are you doing going down there for at 40 years of age?’“It’s just in your blood. You don’t know what to do at the weekend. To be honest, last night I was hovering around the house and I ended up going to watch a jazz band up in Raheny. It’s very hard to fill the vacuum and I’m out of the game a long time now.“It’s that buzz of going training, the craic in the dressing room, match days, getting yourself right and not in my case, but letting the hair down after the game. It was a great cycle of playing football, win or lose.“You become a bit… Institutionalised is probably the wrong word to use, but you become very accustomed to the routine.” Eviston has managed Shamrock Rovers, Athlone Town, Dundalk and Raheny United. Source: Andrew Paton/INPHO10. Managing expectationsAfter retiring (and even slightly before then), Eviston combined his day job as a teacher with coaching. He was briefly player-manager of both Shamrock Rovers and Athlone Town in the mid-to-late ’90s, and also spent a year in charge of Dundalk between 1999 and 2000.In 2004, Eviston returned to the League of Ireland as an assistant manager to Roddy Collins at Dublin City, before following him to Shamrock Rovers later that same year. None of those jobs lasted for a sustained period, however, and he admits to finding the “politics” involved frustrating.“I know some guys take to management, they love every minute of it and it becomes a bit of an addiction. I suppose if things had worked out differently, I might have stayed longer in it. But I didn’t.”There was one further job for Eviston, however, and it saw him claim silverware for the first and only time so far in his managerial career. In 2013, he guided Raheny United Ladies (who have since merged with Shelbourne Ladies) to a FAI Cup triumph, as they beat Castlebar Celtic 3-2 after extra-time.Women’s football in Ireland has made considerable progress since then, and Eviston was delighted to see Cork City — a team he remembers beating 9-0 — improve to the extent that they lifted the FAI Cup last year. However, five years ago, the game was not looking as healthy as it is now, and Eviston quickly grew disillusioned, owing to the lack of genuinely competitive fixtures.There were two decent teams at the time, ourselves and Peamount, and after that, there was a huge gulf,” he says.“We were unbeaten and it’s not that we were unbeaten against top-quality sides. To maintain sincere energy for that is quite difficult.”But at 60, Eviston’s enthusiasm for football in general has not diminished by any means. He has a Uefa B license in coaching and when asked about the possibility of a return to the League of Ireland, he says “never say never”.And interestingly, having retired from full-time teaching last year, Eviston recently spent time “doing a few coaching courses”. An Everton side that had recently won the 1995 FA Cup final played against Eviston for his testimonial. Source: EMPICS Sport11. The Royle treatmentWhatever the Dundalk legend does next is almost bound to be second-best to playing, however. During this interview, Eviston on more than one occasion notes the cyclical nature of his career — from flopping at Rovers to going back to the same club a decade later and silencing the doubters by winning an improbable fourth league title, to making one of his first appearances at Home Farm against Everton, his childhood team, and facing the same opposition for his testimonial nearly 20 years later. He remembers the latter occasion with particular fondness — the Toffees had just upset a Manchester United side, which included the young lad Eviston came up against at Forest, Roy Keane, beating the Red Devils 1-0 in the FA Cup final.“They were a top side, but it was an end-of-season thing for them as well,” he explains. “They were in town for the weekend. But I remember we met the Everton team in Anabel’s [nightclub]. I was toing and froing, talking to Joe Royle or whatever.“I had remembered going over to see Joe Royle [during his playing days] against Spurs in 1970, the year they won the league. The centre half for Spurs was kicking lumps out of him.“I met him [after the testimonial] and said: ‘If you want to come back to the house…’ I didn’t think anything of it, but I remember the story ran in the paper afterwards in The Tribune — we were all there, [ex-Dundalk player] Barry Keogh, Alan O’Neill, a few friends to help me with the testimonial. We were having an old sing-song or whatever and the doorbell rings at 4am. It’s a taxi with Joe Royle and the backroom staff. We ended up having rasher sandwiches in the kitchen.My youngest son Rory used to collect the Premier League stickers. I woke him up early and he said [pointing at Joe Royle] — I got him in the stickers.”As we chat, Eviston looks proudly at a trophy presented to him in 1997 by Athlone Town to mark his 100th League of Ireland goal, a record that puts him in the all-time top 50 scorers in the competition. A year later, he would score his final goal at 40 — nearly 20 years ago now.“The last one was down in Cobh, a diving header,” he says. “Someone said I was falling anyway, but I put it down to a diving header.“I was like a kid when I scored, I’m a bit embarrassed looking back, the celebrations nearly took the wind out of me. The old fellas would say: ‘Let him go running, we’re going to save our energy.’ The simple things in life, hitting the back of the onion sack, it’s a great feeling for anyone who has played.”The42 is on Instagram! Tap the button below on your phone to follow us! Our ranking of the top 18 transfers between League of Ireland clubs for 2018>‘People think it’s negative coming back to Ireland – I think of it as another bounce forward’> Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Proposal to redraw Waterford Kilkenny boundary will leave a very bitter taste

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first_imgProposal to redraw Waterford – Kilkenny boundary ‘will leave a very bitter taste’ A report from Waterford Boundary Committee recommended redrawing the boundary between south Kilkenny and Waterford 69 Comments By Ronan Smyth https://jrnl.ie/3239014 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 27,552 Views Short URL Share56 Tweet Email1 Feb 14th 2017, 4:53 PM Proposed Kilkenny and Waterford border change. Source: Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government Updated: 11:45 15/02/2017PROPOSAL TO REDRAW the boundaries between Waterford and Kilkenny has drawn criticism in the Marble County.“We don’t want our identity to be changed,” said Councillor Ger Frisby after Kilkenny County Council unanimously rejected a proposal to redraw the boundaries between the two counties.The proposed change is contained in a report by the Waterford Boundary Review committee, which was published last week. It recommended a redrawing of the boundary where land from south Kilkenny would be transferred to Waterford, affecting approximately 4,500 people, to make it easier for local governments to be more effective in the area.Frisby, who lives in the the area that would be affected by the boundary change, said the parish of Slieverue will effectively be split in two between Kilkenny and Waterford.Speaking to theJournal.ie  he said: “We completely object [to the boundary change], you are talking about a person’s county, a person’s parish”.Frisby added “[it] is so divisive, people in the area are so proud of their identity and  any change will leave a very bitter taste”.Yesterday, Kilkenny County Council voted unanimously to give “not an inch” of Kilkenny land to Waterford and it is demanding a meeting with Minister Simon Coveney to discuss the matter.However, former Mayor of Waterford Councillor John Cummins disagrees and has called on the boundary recommendations to be implemented.Cummins said, “Using historic boundaries in modern day Ireland is not appropriate, cities in particular must be allowed to expand into what is their natural hinterland and for too long Waterford has been like a bird with one wing with only south side development in evidence.The reality is Waterford City has to expand Northwards in the decade ahead as South side development land is limited and it is only natural therefore that this area is administered by Waterford City and County Council.Cummins has called on the government to implement the recommendations of the report as a matter of urgency.“This has the potential, along with the Ireland 2040 National Planning Framework which is focusing on the growth of regional cities to be game changer for Waterford and the entire southeast region.” said Cummins.Waterford Boundary Review CommitteeThe committee that produced the boundary report was established under the previous government to review the administrative boundaries between the city and county of Waterford and County Kilkenny.It is one of four such boundary reviews that are being carried out around the country.The committee was asked to make recommendations on the boundary between Waterford and Kilkenny on what it considers to be necessary in the interests of what would be effective and convenient for local government.Over the course of the review the committee received close to 20,000 submissions.Most of the submissions were opposed to the boundary change, citing a sense of identity and belonging to County Kilkenny, as well as financial implications to Kilkenny due to loss of tax revenue.However, the committee did receive submissions advocating for the changing of the boundary, with many of the respondents saying that Kilkenny County Council has never invested properly in the area and that residents would benefit from a closer proximity to a service provider.Kilkenny County Council After the vote yesterday, Cathaoirleach of Kilkenny County Council Matt Doran wrote to Minister Coveney to convey the council’s dismay, anger and disappointment about the issue.Frisby went on to say that the council will be engaging in the consultation process going forward for Ireland 2040, the new National Planning Framework, which is a national strategy for long-term planning and development across Ireland. But Frisby feels that the 20,000 submissions from the public were not taken into account by the boundary review committee when making their recommendations.However, the decision on the boundary change has not been made yet and it is yet to be considered by Minister Coveney.A spokesman for the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government said that “The Minister will consider the report and its implications very carefully in the context both of ongoing work in relation to the future of local government in Ireland and also the development of Ireland 2040, the new National Planning Framework over the coming months.“We would encourage people in the counties included in the boundary reviews to use the Reports to take part in the consultation process on the Plan. This is an important opportunity for them to get their views across on the future of the country, their regions, their counties, their local areas and their communities.”READ: Former head of Garda Press Office ‘delighted’ to be back at work after 22-month suspensionREAD: Ibrahim Halawa’s trial has been delayed for a 19th time Tuesday 14 Feb 2017, 4:53 PMlast_img read more

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There are no northside DARTs running today or tomorrow

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first_imgThere are no northside DARTs running today or tomorrow If you were planning to take the DART, you can’t. Unless you live on the southside. By Daragh Brophy Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Share Tweet Email4 Saturday 29 Apr 2017, 7:30 AM Apr 29th 2017, 7:30 AM Image: Shutterstock/Olena Zaskochenko This handsome man is a stock image, and that’s not an actual DART station. If you must, please look below for a picture of a DART. Image: Shutterstock/Olena Zaskochenko 23,369 Views 18 Comments This handsome man is a stock image, and that’s not an actual DART station. If you must, please look below for a picture of a DART. http://jrnl.ie/3364206 THERE ARE SOME major changes to rail services in the Dublin area and further up the east coast this weekend.It’s due to engineering works taking place between Killester and Skerries, in the north of Dublin county.There are also line improvement works taking place on the Heuston line.Here’s what’s happening with the DART today and tomorrow:DART services will operate between Dublin Connolly, Bray and Greystones onlyThere will be no train service between Dublin Connolly, Malahide and Howth(Dublin bus will accept valid rail tickets for travel within the affected DART route).For Drogheda and Dundalk passengers: Today: An hourly timetable will operate between Dundalk/Drogheda and Skerries with connecting bus transfers to/from Donabate and Connolly Station.Tomorrow: An amended timetable will operate between Dundalk/Drogheda and Skerries with connecting bus transfers to/from Donabate and Connolly Station.Belfast train: Enterprise services will operate to/from Drogheda, a direct bus transfer will operate to/from Drogheda and Dublin Connolly. Source: Sam BoalHeuston line Line improvement works are taking place on the Dublin to Cork line, focusing on the area between Hazelhatch (near Celbridge) and Thurles.There are changes to a number of services as a result today. Full details on the Irish Rail website.Read: EU President’s letter: Britain must settle ‘people, money and Ireland’ first >Read: Trouble for Le Pen as her replacement steps aside amid allegations of Holocaust denial >last_img read more

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Users of Epipens warned to check theirs as batch is recalled

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first_imgUsers of Epipens warned to check theirs as batch is recalled The recall affects around 1,000 units. By Paul Hosford Tuesday 21 Mar 2017, 3:49 PM 15,699 Views Image: HPRA A picture of the Epipen. THOSE WHO USE Epipens have been told to check their stocks as a batch has been recalled.The Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA) today said it had been told by Meda Health Sales Ireland that it is recalling one batch of its Epipen 300mcg pre-filled pens.The pens are used in the emergency treatment of acute allergic (anaphylactic) reactions. However, pens from the affected batch may fail to provide an injection of medicine when used, due to a quality defect issue identified in a component part.Anyone who possesses an Epipen for their own use or for someone in their care is urged to check for lot number 5FA665G and to ensure affected pens are immediately replaced.Lot 5FA665G includes a total of 998 Epipens supplied to the Irish market and it is estimated that the defect is associated with only a small percentage of pens in the lot.The lot number can be found on parts of the label and carton.Those with the pens are told to return theirs to their pharmacy where it will be replaced free of charge. They are also told to check other areas where pens may be stored such as schools.Should patients have any concerns in relation to this matter, they should consult their doctor or pharmacist.Read: The sea turtle who swallowed almost 1,000 coins has died http://jrnl.ie/3299211 center_img Mar 21st 2017, 3:49 PM A picture of the Epipen. Image: HPRA Short URL Share1930 Tweet Email28 6 Comments Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Know Your Sport Take our weekly quiz

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first_img Share your result: Lisbon Share your result: Jón Daði Böðvarsson Racing Share 3. Joy Neville was one of three Irish officials named to take charge during this summer’s Women’s Rugby World Cup, what position did the ex-international play? By Steve O’Rourke LA San Diego Madrid You scored out of ! INPHO INPHO Rickie Fowler Kildare Cork Jon Rahm Cork UAE INPHO Offaly PA 7. Which county sits top of Division 1 of the Lidl Ladies National Football League after last week’s results? Prop 4. Ireland’s hopes of securing Test status suffered a massive blow this week when they lost to what country? Alfreð Finnbogason 8. It was confirmed this week that Donnacha Ryan is set to leave Munster for what French club? Afghanistan ‘I missed a penalty, we lost the game and Roy sent me home with my arse well reddened’Fifa open proceedings against Wales’ Neil Taylor after Coleman horror tackle Scotland Short URL Armagh PA Back-row You scored out of ! PA Carlow 6.Who scored the only goal of the game as Iceland beat Ireland on Tuesday? You scored out of ! 5. Leona Maguire cemented her spot as the world’s best amateur with another collegiate victory this week but what county is she from? Galway Tweet Wing Bronze Well now. There’s not much we can say about that. Do you even like sport? Hong Kong Share 1, This bust of Cristiano Ronaldo made headlines for all the wrong reasons this week, but at what airport was it unveiled? Centre 2. Which of these sides did not feature in an Eirgrid U21 provincial football final this week? center_img Tweet Stade Français 10. It was announced this week that the Oakland Raiders will play in a new city from 2020, where is it? Wooden Spoon The questions just didn’t suit you this time. Maybe try again next week Las Vegas INPHO Toulouse Share9 Tweet Email Dustin Johnson Rory McIlroy PA Kerry PA Tweet PA San Antonio Silver Cavan Madeira Gold Hordur Bjorgvin Magnusson INPHO Mar 31st 2017, 5:00 PM Answer all the questions to see your result! Tweet Share your result: Cork Know Your Sport? Take our weekly quiz How closely were you paying attention to the sports headlines this week? You scored out of ! Share INPHO PA Not too bad at all. If you’d paid a little more attention you could have won the gold. Holmar Eyjolfsson Pau Share your result: http://the42.ie/3316264 Dublin 9. Who won the WGC Match Play event last week? 18 Comments 30,545 Views Clare Top of the pile, you really were paying attention this week. Manchester INPHO Share Friday 31 Mar 2017, 5:00 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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The 9 at 9 Monday

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first_img http://jrnl.ie/3332419 Apr 10th 2017, 8:48 AM The 9 at 9: Monday Here’s everything you need to know as you start your day. 2 Comments 13,140 Views Image: Shutterstock/portumen EVERY MORNING, TheJournal.ie brings you the stories you need to know as you start your day.1. #BUS ÉIREANN: All sides in the Bus Éireann dispute are said to be committed to a successful conclusion to negotiations within 24 hours.2. #GARDAÍ: Middle-ranking members of An Garda Síochána are calling for people who share pictures of them online with the aim of identifying them to be criminally sanctioned.3. #TUAM: Letters released to TheJournal.ie under the Freedom of Information Act show how Minister Katherine Zappone was informed that a significant number of human remains were discovered at the site of a former mother and baby home in Tuam, Co Galway.4. #EGYPT: Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has announced a three-month state of emergency following twin church bombings by the so-called Islamic State group that killed dozens of people yesterday.5. #CORK: A man in his early 40s has become the sixth person in a week to be arrested in connection with the murder of former Real IRA chief Aidan O’Driscoll.6. #COLD CASES: TheJournal.ie is taking a look at Ireland’s unsolved homicides. Read the first part of the series here.7. #WEXFORD: Gardaí have made a fresh appeal for witnesses following a single-car crash that left a man with serious injuries in New Ross, Co Wexford.8. #GREAT BARRIER REEF: Coral bleached for two consecutive years at Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has “zero prospect” of recovery, scientists warned today, as they confirmed the site has again been hit by warming sea temperatures.9. #GOLF: Sergio Garcia won the Masters yesterday, his first major title. Short URL By Órla Ryan Image: Shutterstock/portumen Monday 10 Apr 2017, 8:48 AM Share Tweet Email Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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My name is Lavinia First rape survivor to waive anonymity tells her

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first_imgShe said that the moment was “hugely important” for her.“It was like sitting beside him, I didn’t realise there were 100,000s of people listening. It was very personal, he was hugely compassionate. From start to finish, I did not hear him interrupt that conversation.”During her campaign for the introduction of victim impact statements, and said that she was made to feel like she was “doing the wrong thing”. When applause of thanks broke out from presenter Ryan Tubridy and the studio audience for her work to introduce victim impact statements in Ireland, Lavinia said that she hadn’t received anything like it before. By Gráinne Ní Aodha Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Source: Daithi K./Twitter https://jrnl.ie/4532234 25 Comments Share2025 Tweet Email2 108,661 Views Addressing the camera, she asked for others who had been raped to tell their family, friends, or the authorities.This guilt and shame does not belong to you, it belongs to the rapist.If you need to talk, contact:If you’ve been affected by any of the issues raised in this piece, please contact the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre.center_img ‘My name is Lavinia’: First rape survivor to waive anonymity tells her story “Pre-1991, you would never hear the word ‘rape’ on radio, it was like a curse word,” Lavinia Kerwick said in an emotional interview. Mar 9th 2019, 2:01 PM “This guilt and shame does not belong to you, it belongs to the rapist” Well said, Lavinia Kerwick #LateLateShow pic.twitter.com/OqDC1q2X8H— Daithi K. (@tvcritics) March 9, 2019 Source: The Late Late Show/YouTubeTHE FIRST IRISH rape victim to waive her anonymity after the man convicted of raping her received a suspended sentence has said that she was always made to feel that campaigning for the introduction of victim impact statements “was the wrong thing”.After the man who violently assaulted her when she was 19 walked free, Lavinia Kerwick  waived her right to anonymity in an interview with Gerry Ryan on RTÉ 2FM in 1993.Lavinia told last night’s Late Late Show that she’s never listened back to the interview because she “remembers every word”.Kerwick credited the late presenter Ryan for helping her to tell her story. Lavinia said last night that Gerry Ryan’s use of the word “rape” caught her attention:“Pre-90/91, you would never hear the word ‘rape’ on radio, it was like a curse word,” she said. So I just picked up the phone, and he was the first person in all those months that asked me my name. And I just said ‘My name is Lavinia’ That was it. Short URL Saturday 9 Mar 2019, 2:00 PMlast_img read more

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New Greek statistics chief promises clean data

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Greece’s new statistics agency chief promised swift reforms that would produce reliable financial data free from government interference.Former IMF official Andreas Georgiou took up his post Thursday heading the statistics agency that had been widely discredited last year after the then incoming Papandreou government revealed that budget data had been embellished.The agency now has been placed under parliamentary oversight and not under direct government control.Serious errors in Greek deficit data, revealed last year, helped trigger the European government debt crisis rattled world markets and confidence in the euro.“When there is a deadline, it must be met. We must reach the highest standard … There can be no flexibility on this point,” Georgiou said.Creating an independent agency – renamed as the Hellenic Statistical Authority – was a key step, along with painful austerity measures, for Greece to be granted 110 billion euros in rescue loans from the International Monetary Fund and other European Union countries that use the euro.The European Union blamed government interference and shoddy accounting practices for the massive errors, which saw Greece shoot four times above the deficit cap set for the eurozone.The government has promised to work closer with the EU statistics agency, Eurostat, to produce reliable data. Georgiou said the Greek agency required a “shift in mentality” to overcome prevailing negative perceptions and achieve a higher standard.“We face a great responsibility, because problems with statistical data can have negative consequences for the national economy. We must never let this happen again,” Georgiou told an audience of about 200 employees. “We must overcome the negative perception about Greek statistics… Our ascent will not be quick but it will be achieved.”last_img read more

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Community schools to be supported

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Community schools who provide a variety of languages have been assured they will have continuing support from the Victorian Government. At the 9th National Community Languages Schools Conference held in Melbourne on Sunday 3 July, the government reiterated the importance of the role community languages schools play in delivering linguistic and cultural diversity and strengthening social inclusion. Nicholas Kotsiras, Minister for Multicultural Affairs and Citizenship, told the conference the government is committed to language education and that he would do everything in his power to continue to support language schools. David Howes, general manger, Curriculum VCCA, talked about the national curriculum and support for all languages and Katherine Henderson, regional director, Western Metropolitan Region DEECD, spoke about the partnerships between mainstream school and community language schools. The above speakers told over 400 community languages schools that they will endeavour to maintain these strong bonds. The Australian Federation of Ethnic Schools Association Council worked together with the participants to find a way to deliver strong linguistic and cultural maintenance programs to over 100,000 students studying 69 languages nationally.last_img read more

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Tsochadzopoulos taken to Korydallos prison

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first_imgFormer Pasok minister Akis Tsohadzopoulos was remanded in custody pending trial at Korydallos prison on Tuesday, on foot of an order issued the previous by an examining magistrate and prosecutor order that he be remanded in custody pending trial. Tsohadzopoulos faces money laundering charges that centre on kickbacks that he allegedly received in order to approve the purchase of the TOR-M1 missile systems and submarines for the Greek NavyThe delay in bringing him to prison resulted in Easter Monday being a public holiday. He had been kept at Athens police headquarters since his arrested on Wednesday. Prosecutors began taking testimony from three other defendants in the case money-laundering case on Tuesday. Efrosini Lambropoulou, an accountant and legal representative of the three offshore companies linked with the former minister, was remanded in custody by decision of the examining magistrate and prosecutor, after the conclusion of her testimony. Nikos Zigras, a cousin and close associate of Tsochadzopoulos, was the next to appear. Yiorgos Sachpatzidis, an entrepreneur and major shareholder of PAOK FC, is the third defendant.The bank accounts of all three were frozen on Friday.Tsochadzopoulos, 72, who has held various portfolios including defence since the 1980s, faces felony charges in relation to property deals and possible tax violations.Tsochadzopoulos nearly became prime minister in 1996 only to be narrowly defeated in an internal party vote to become chairman of the then ruling Socialist PASOK party. Since quitting politics in 2009, he has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing in a string of affairs investigated by court prosecutors, including the use of offshore companies to buy a luxurious mansion in Athens and the sale of German submarines to the Greek navy.Source: Athens News Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Constantinidis to give lecture at Melbourne Museum

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first_imgLecture on Cultural Heritage Preservation in a Cyber World, by Dora Constantinidis, will be held as part of the exhibition Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures of the National Museum of Kabul that is currently showcasing at the Melbourne Museum. With continuing advances in computer technology the trend for archaeologists to use mobile digital devices in fieldwork has quickly gained ground. With a focus on war torn Afghanistan, in this lecture archaeologist and information technology expert Dora Constantinidis will explore how mobile devices – in the hands of archaeologists and local populations alike – can record archaeological remains and thereby help catalogue and preserve cultural heritage. Dora Constantinidis, whose archaeological research focuses on the Middle East and the Aegean, is an expert in the use of computer technology in gathering and analysing archaeological data. Having completed undergraduate studies at the University of Melbourne and then a PhD from the University of Athens, Dr Constantinidis returned to Melbourne, where she is a Fellow in the Centre for Classics and Archaeology, a researcher in the Computing and Information Systems department at the University of Melbourne, and teaches in the Faculty of Information Technology at Monash University. The lecture will be held on Thursday 6 Jun, 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm, at the Museum Theatre. Admission fee: $12 adult, $10 concession and MV members. To purchase tickets online, visit www.museumvictoria.com.au/melbournemuseum/tickets/ or contact 13 11 02. The exhibition Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures will not be open after the lecture finishes. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Taking the pulse of a geometric Greek settlement

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Presented by The Australian Archeological Institute at Athens AAIA Fieldwork at Zagora in 2012 this public lecture, given by Professor Margaret C. Miller (University of Sydney Professor of Classical Archaeology & Co-Director of the The Zagora Archaeological Project), looks at the site of Zagora. The uniquely well preserved 9th-8th century BC Greek site of Zagora on the island of Andros provides us with an unparalleled opportunity to study community life at the dawn of the Greek city-state. Fieldwork conducted under the direction of Prof. A Cambitoglou in the 1960s and 1970s exposed a tenth of the site, revealing a flourishing settlement, but one that was abandoned after a mere six or seven generations in a time of widespread social and economic change.The Zagora Archaeological Project, under the auspices of the Archaeological Society at Athens and the AAIA, now aims to build on those research achievements. But how, most effectively, with the resources at our command, can we “take the pulse” of this short-lived town? How can we chart its own social and economic development? The field season of 2012 has already raised some interesting perspectives.  When: Thursday 25 July, 8:00 pm Where: Poseidon Room of the Hellenic Club, Woden Cost: Freelast_img read more

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Missing mum found

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first_imgSeven days after Ascot Vale mother-of-two Angelika Peters went missing, her husband Adam Gray and daughters Arna and Jessica Dionysopoulos have welcomed her home.“Angelika walked in the door yesterday afternoon after a week of living/hiding outdoors. She is ok and will receive the help she has asked for,” said her husband Adam Gray talking to Neos Kosmos.Ms Peters left the family home on Thursday September 4 and concerns for her safety grew in the days that followed, particularly since she left without taking any significant personal possessions such as bank cards, jewellery or her mobile phone.As the family became increasingly worried her eldest daughter, Arna, 25, travelling from Canberra to Melbourne to help search for her mother.Ms Peters had been struggling to cope with a severe latex allergy which forced her to terminate her 20-year nursing career earlier this year. Most recently she had been working in the radiology unit of the Royal Melbourne Hospital.The family spent last week putting up posters on the streets of Ascot Vale and making enquiries in Lalor where Angelika spent time as a child. Supporting the police’s search effort were Ms Peters’ brother who flew in from Queensland and her sister from Ireland.Mr Gray said that his wife suffered from depression related to the loss of her job, “but the extent of it we weren’t aware of”. A contributing factor to Ms Peters’ psychological state is believed to be the recent death of a family pet.Mr Gray told Neos Kosmos that his wife had previously gone missing for a day last month.“She went for a walk and just kept walking.” On that occasion Angelika returned in the afternoon. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Even some German MPs think reparations should be paid

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Several senior Social Democrats (SPD) and Greens have for the first time said Germany should consider paying reparations to Greece for Nazi crimes committed during World War II, breaking ranks with Angela Merkel’s government which has ruled this out.Relations between Germany and Greece are deteriorating by the day as Athens tries to renegotiate its bailout terms and Berlin fears it will ditch previously agreed financial promises.Leftist Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, has accused Germany of using tricks to avoid reparations. One of his ministers raised the prospect of seizing German property to compensate victims of a Nazi massacre.While Berlin says it has honoured its obligations, including a 115-million-deutschemark payment to Greece in 1960, some mainstream politicians have contradicted the government and say it is impossible to draw a line under the highly-charged issue.“We should make a financial approach to victims and their families,” said Gesine Schwan, a respected member of the Social Democrats (SPD) who share power with Merkel’s conservatives.“It would be good for us Germans to sweep up after ourselves in terms of our history,” she told Spiegel Online. “Victims and descendants have longer memories than perpetrators and descendants,” said Schwan, twice nominated as a candidate for German president.Germany, keen to avoid setting a precedent by reopening the issue, argues that the 1990 “Two Plus Four Treaty” signed by then-East Germany and West Germany and the four World War II allies before German reunification drew a line under future claims.Resentment runs deep. Nazi forces destroyed scores of Greek villages and killed more than 20,000 civilians between 1941 and 1944.In a chat show on ARD television on Sunday, Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis said it was about morals, not money.“Personally I would be happy if one euro is paid. As long as there was a recognition that this moral debt has been settled,” he said, adding that he was speaking as an individual.A further question hangs over an “occupation loan” forced on the Bank of Greece which some experts put at 11 billion euros.Schwan said the occupation loan must “of course be repaid.”SPD deputy chairman Ralf Stegner, representing the party’s left, said reparations should not be linked to the euro crisis.“But independently, we must have a discussion about reparations,” Ralf Stegner told Spiegel Online. “After decades, there are still international legal questions to be resolved.”Greens co-leader Anton Hofreiter said the issue could not be brushed off as it was “neither morally nor legally closed.”Source: Reuters.last_img read more

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Strong earthquake recorded in Cyprus

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first_imgThe Cyprus Geological Survey Department says a strong earthquake has shaken the east Mediterranean island. There were no immediate reports of any serious damage or injuries.The 5.6 magnitude tremor shortly before noon Wednesday was centred on Cyprus’ southwestern coastline and was felt across the country including in the capital, Nicosia. The epicentre was 8 kilometres (5 miles) northwest of the coastal town of Paphos at a depth of 25 kilometres (15 miles).The department said the earthquake was followed by about 10 aftershocks.Paphos District Officer Yiannakis Mallourides said authorities reported no major damage to structures or injuries, and were monitoring the situation.Cyprus is near a seismically active area and earthquakes occur relatively frequently. The last major quake that caused structural damage occurred some 15 years ago. Source: AP Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Keeping Greece alive through portraits

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Cynthia Tzitzis is taking photos of her friends.Mainly young people who came to the UK the last few years in search of a better future and left Greece behind, like she did.In a way. Because, by inhabiting prosperous new fields, these young people keep carrying Greece’s debris with them; by creating easy to carry memory tool cases, by making associations not so obvious to the bare eye, by making new friends who could have been part of the childhood they left behind, by inventing places in between, by simulating and comparing flavours and scents, habits and experiences.The 31 acquaintances and friends of the photographer, who were chosen by her for different important reasons, compose this chapter and set a pause to it. Kostas KopanarisThey generously offer to Tzitzis’ lens the small fertile gardens of ‘now’ that they had to create and inhabit while, at the same time, they were leaving ‘there’ behind. And they allowed the photographer’s penetrative glance to focus and capture all those elements that they love and all those that they are in an eloquent, unadorned and articulate manner. By choosing the space and setting the angle of the shot, Cynthia Tzitzis brings the ‘faces’ on her lens –literally and metaphorically- in a direct confrontation with the viewer who is allowed a temporary intrusion into their lives.Vassilis & Arhondi KorkaBy composing the materia prima of the image, framing this image with surgical precision and clarity, translucently inserting the subjects and objects that it is consisted of, determining either the ‘together’ or the ‘solitary’ of the protagonists, organising the microcosm of her models with absolute limpidity and image-making dexterity, implying their personal and professional identity, deconstructing and reconstructing all the stories that they left behind them and by outlining the coordinates which set the current time of their expeditious British biorhythm, Cynthia Tzitzis creates a bespoke and exceptionally eloquent register of people who act consciously while feeling nostalgic but mainly while knowing and interpreting the past, seizing the present and anticipating the future with an optimistic self-awareness.Sofia KonstantopoulouTracing back to Milan Kundera’s ‘Ignorance’, a novel which apart from its great narrative, constitutes simultaneously “a thrilling essay about the existential issues of self-exile, expatriation and internal emigration; an essay about the nostalgia and the remembrance that define the finite of human existence, an existence that is eternally trapped in the ‘age of ignorance’1, one reads: “The Greek word for ‘return’ is nostos. Algos means ‘suffering’. So nostalgia is the suffering caused by an unappeased yearning to return”. The hovering of the self and the moments of ‘now’ and ‘there’, along with the issue of nostalgia as a choice for the next day are the topics that preoccupy Cynthia Tzitzis’ photographs as a whole.*In collaboration with The Greek Foundationlast_img read more

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Luxury camping site to open in northern Greece

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The first five-star camping site is set to open in northern Greece within the next couple of months. The €30 million (A$42m) investment is located in Skotina, a seaside area in Pieria, on a property where an old camping site, operated by the Greek Tourism Organisation, has been abandoned for years. ‘Skotina Resort’ (a company of Greek American businessmen) leased the property for 60 years from the Greek Public Property Company in 2013. The existing 31 bungalows are undergoing thorough renovations, as are the edifices to be used for dining, entertainment, and shopping. The completely renovated ‘luxury camping’ operation will be ready to operate this tourist season, with a second phase of development (including an environmentally friendly 250-room capacity hotel, a convention centre, and a marina) is planned to be completed by 2019. Investors are aiming to attract visitors with high incomes who are interested in being in touch with nature, hiking, cultural tourism and ecotourism.last_img read more

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Une année de lours réclamée dans les Pyrénées

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first_imgUne année de l’ours réclamée dans les PyrénéesFrance – Alors que 2010 a été décrétée Année internationale de la biodiversité par l’ONU, des associations ont réclamé qu’elle soit également l’année de l’ours brun dans les Pyrénées.Craignant de voir cet animal emblématique disparaître définitivement des Pyrénées, des associations telles que Ferus et Pays de l’Ours-Adet, ont souhaité attirer l’attention sur la cause de l’animal en accrochant trois grands ours en peluche au pont de l’Alma à Paris. Cette même action avait déjà été conduite il y a vingt ans et les défenseurs de l’ours ont tenu à la réitérer afin de souligner que “rien n’a changé ou presque”, comme l’a expliqué Sandrine Andrieux-Rolland, de Ferus.Les ours en peluche sont accompagnés d’une banderole sur laquelle on peut lire : “2010 = Année Internationale de la Biodiversité. ET L’OURS ?”. Classésen danger critique d’extinction en France par l’Union mondiale pour la Nature (UICN), une vingtaine d’ours bruns sont recensés dans les Pyrénées. Ils sont répartis en trois colonies dont l’une n’est composée que de mâles qui “n’ont donc aucune chance de se maintenir” insiste Ferus.Réclamant que 2010 soit décrétée année de l’ours brun dans les Pyrénées, les associations demandent également un nouveau plan de restauration de la population avec des lâchers d’ours “au rythme d’un ou 2 par an”.En 2006, quatre femelles et un mâle avaient ainsi été lâchés, provoquant une véritable guerre entre les villages pro et anti-ours. Le 22 janvier 2010 à 10:12 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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