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Volcanic eruptions may have periodically wiped out Antarctic penguin colonies

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first_img Long-term changes in climate and sea ice coverage aren’t the only problems that Antarctica’s penguins face: Volcanoes can also take their toll, a new study suggests. Consider gentoo penguins (Pygoscelius papua), which have a major breeding colony (image) on Ardley Island off the Antarctic peninsula. The orange-billed birds first appeared on the island about 6700 years ago, and previous studies indicate that the climate and sea surface temperatures in the region have been good to them thus far. But sediment cores drilled from a 7300-square-meter lake on the island—which today collects runoff that includes prodigious amounts of penguin guano as well as material eroded from the island’s bedrock—tell a different story. At three times since the birds arrived, major eruptions of a volcano on Deception Island, which lies about 120 kilometers away, have cloaked Ardley Island with centimeters-thick layers of ash that later washed into the lake, the researchers report in Nature Communications. It’s not clear whether each of those ash layers chronicles a single large eruption or a closely spaced sequence of smaller ones. Regardless, guano-free followed by guano-poor sediments left in the wake of these three eruptions suggest that breeding penguins were wiped out—or abandoned the island for posteruption intervals ranging between 400 and 800 years. Thick layers of ash would have made it hard for the birds to breathe, compromised the immune systems of adult and hatchling penguins, and may have prevented adults from collecting pebbles that they needed to construct their nests, the researchers suggest.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) By Sid PerkinsApr. 11, 2017 , 11:00 AM Volcanic eruptions may have periodically wiped out Antarctic penguin colonieslast_img read more

India seek to clinch first Asia Cup title in 15 years

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first_imgIndia will aim to set right their woeful record in ODI finals and end a 15-year-old jinx when they take on familiar foes Sri Lanka in the final of the Asia Cup cricket tournament here tomorrow.Their pride pricked once again by a dominant Sri Lanka last night, India will also seek to avenge yesterday’s defeat at the Rangiri International Stadium where they slumped to a comprehensive seven-wicket defeat.Mahendra Singh Dhoni struggled to explain the humiliating loss but the fact remains that India were completely outclassed by the Lankans, who are gradually developing into a powerful one-day side.That they have trounced India in three ODI finals since 2008, besides the victory in the Twenty20 World Cup, indicates that the inspired Lankans would be a hard bunch to be beat even if Harbhajan Singh and Ashish Nehra, rested yesterday, return tomorrow.Dhoni would also hope to end a 15-year title drought that followed India’s last Asia Cup triumph in Sharjah in 1995.Yesterday’s defeat not only exposed India’s batting frailties but also raised questions about some selection issues.With Sachin Tendulkar opting to spend time with his family, India should have had an opening batsman in the reserves. But they chose middle-order batsman Saurabh Tiwary, while Rohit Sharma and Virat Kohli fight for a permanent slot.It didn’t come as a surprise when the team management hurriedly flew in Dinesh Karthik as a replacement when regular opener Virender Sehwag suffered a hamstring injury.Another startling gaffe by the team management was the inclusion of left-arm spinner Pragyan Ojha for the last match.advertisementWith Sehwag, who had claimed four wickets for six runs against Bangladesh, out of the tournament and Harbhajan Singh rested, Dhoni should have logically played R Ashwin as a replacement for an off-break bowler.But he chose to play Ojha when India already had a left-arm tweaker in Ravindra Jadeja.Evidently, off-break bowlers have held sway right through the tournament but India chose to ignore this fact and paid the price for their imprudence.On the other hand, Sri Lanka have been prudent in their team selection. Every selection made by Aravinda de Silva and co-selectors has been made with an eye on the 2011 World Cup.last_img read more

Las Vegas marathon moves start line away from shooting scene

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first_imgFILE – In this Dec. 5, 2010 file photo, runners fill the Las Vegas Strip in the shadow of the Mandalay Bay hotel, top left, during the Las Vegas Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon in Las Vegas. The upcoming Las Vegas Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon on Nov. 12, has a new start line and race festival grounds. The race will start in front of the New York-New York resort on the Las Vegas Strip, about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) north of last year’s start near the Mandalay Bay. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, File)LAS VEGAS — The start line for the upcoming Las Vegas Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon has been moved away from the site of the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, organizers said Friday.The Nov. 12 evening race will start in front of the New York-New York resort on the Las Vegas Strip, about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) north of last year’s start near the Mandalay Bay hotel, Rock ‘n’ Roll marathon series executive Josh Furlow said.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Argentine bishop appears at court hearing on abuse charges ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims No more menthol cigarettes: New ban on tobacco, vape flavors LATEST STORIES Palace: Robredo back to ‘groping with a blind vision’ Winter storm threatens to scramble Thanksgiving travel plans MOST READ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Cruz said about 40,000 runners are expected for various races during the weekend marking the 51st running of a race that evolved from a flat, wind-swept desert event in 1967 to a glitzy and music-filled attraction.There won’t be the usual bandstands, musical groups and amplified sound for the first 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) of the marathon and half-marathon, in tribute to victims and affected families, he said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trump to designate Mexican drug cartels as terrorist groups Efficient Fournier leads Magic rout of Spurs The Mandalay Bay was the hotel from which a gunman on the 32nd floor fired assault-style weapons Oct. 1 into a country music concert crowd of about 22,000 people, killing 58 and injuring almost 550.After using that same open-air festival ground for pre-race activities the last several years, the gathering spot for this year’s marathon and half-marathon will be between the New York-New York and Monte Carlo casinos and the T-Mobile Arena, said Dan Cruz, spokesman for race organizer The Competitor Group.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThe overall 26.2-mile (42-kilometer) marathon and 13.1-mile (21-kilometer) half-marathon courses are still being finalized, Cruz said. But the new start line means runners will twice pass the site of the shooting as they run south on the Strip, loop around the “Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign and head north again past casino marquees.An on-course tribute is planned near the site of the shooting, including a #VegasStrong signing wall that people can sign during a race expo beginning Nov. 9 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim View comments Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’last_img read more

The Wedge Approach to Climate Change

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first_imgThere is no shortage of options and suggestions for how to address climate change. The more difficult task is determining which solutions, or mix of solutions, will reduce greenhouse gas emissions on the scale of what is needed to avoid disasterous climate change impacts.In the face of rapidly developing economies, population growth, and rising energy demand, it is clear that technology absolutely must be part of the solution. We will need significantly cleaner energy sources than the ones used today. And we need much faster market penetration than has been the historic norm.In a 2004 Science Magazine article, Princeton professors Rob Socolow and Stephen Pacala introduced the wedge approach to frame this debate. The idea is elegant and simple. To stabilize emissions in the next 50 years, the world must reduce emissions by about 7 gigatons of carbon (not carbon dioxide) compared to “business as usual” scenarios. So Socolow and Pacala identify 15 stabilization wedges that, if deployed at a significant global scale, could concievably reduce emissions by 1 gigaton each.At 1 gigaton apiece, each technology wedge still represents a huge investment, but they are nonetheless conceivable. Some examples of the 15 proposed stabilization wedges:Increase fuel economy for 2 billion cars from 30 to 60 mpgCut carbon emissions by 25% in buildings and appliances projected for 2054Add 4 million 1-MW-peak windmills (100 times current capacity)Add 100 times the current Brazil or U.S. ethanol production, with the use of 250 million hectares (one-sixth of world cropland)Introduce carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) at 800 GW worth of coal plants or 1,600 GW worth of natural gas plants (U.S. coal plants have an average capacity of roughly 1 GW).7 gigatons of reductions are needed to achieve stabilization, so 7 of 15 wedges would, in theory, reach that goal. If deeper reductions become necessary, additional wedges could be added to the mix.Source: Pacala and Socolow, Science Magazine, 2004.The challenge for policymakers is to decide which wedges are preferable, and how to redirect capital towards the deployment of preferred technologies. WRI’s climate policy and capital markets projects are teaming up to answer these critical questions.Now Goldman Sachs wants to take the wedge model to the next stage. A partnership with WRI’s wedge deployment project will analyze the best ways to accelerate the global adoption of technologies in the wedge model through government policies, corporate action, and financial investment. In other words, turn the wedge approach into action as quickly as possible.The research project will analyze:Market potential and barriers of key low carbon technologies.Government policies that can lead to breakthrough and rapid deployment of clean technologiesWhich companies are positioned to deliver these technologiesThe project will also identify the most promising technology options, and develop a roadmap for policymakers to propogate those options on a large scale to address climate change.last_img read more

A Vision for Clean Energy in Asia

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first_imgThis piece is adapted from a speech that was delivered on June 25th at the 5th Asia Clean Energy Forum: Meeting the Technology Transfer Challenge. The forum, hosted by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the World Resources Institute, is the premiere knowledge sharing platform on best practices in policy, technology, and finance for clean energy in the Asian region.There once was a legendary industrialist who was notoriously protective of his privacy. So it came as a shock to a young reporter when he granted her request for an interview – on one condition: she could only ask three questions.When the day of the interview arrived, she sat down and said: “You are one of the most successful people in the world and your business has redefined industry. What has made you so successful?”He replied: “Good decisions.” She waited and waited but he said nothing else. She reflected a bit and then asked: “Well, how did you make such good decisions?”He replied: “Experience.” She was beside herself. Two questions and he had answered with only three words!So she thought long and hard about her last question: “How did you get this experience?”The man replied, with a wry smile, “Bad decisions.”This story captures an important message for me from this conference. Bold goals and big success require the ability to take risks and learn from mistakes. This will be especially true for all of us here committed to working towards a virtually zero-carbon economy.However, the challenge we face is that we don’t have much time.According to the IPCC, global GHG emissions should peak by 2015 – that is in 5 years—if we want a fighting chance to keep climate change below 2 degrees.According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), investment in clean energy will need to exceed $2.2 trillion dollars over the next 10 years above the reference scenario.We must meet these goals while still addressing major development and energy poverty challenges, including the spiraling energy needs of developing countries.This conference has been a terrific platform to share what works, what doesn’t and what we can learn from each other. I’d like to offer a few lessons and insights that came through for me – and which I believe are essential if we are to succeed in fostering a clean energy revolution.1. “Loud, Long and Legal”: The Right Policies for Clean EnergyTo meet this challenge, we need clear and ambitious policy to promote clean energy, and we need to be able to learn as we go.The message of the Bonn Conference on Renewables about six years ago showed that policy needs to be loud, long and legal if we are to drive investment in clean energy. This message is consistent with recent research from WRI and the Peterson Institute for International Economics on the wind and solar sectors. We found that new wind and solar investments were tightly correlated to government support policies. When strong and predictable incentives for clean energy were put in place, investments went up. When incentives expired or were canceled, clean energy investments collapsed.We know that policy is critical for building clean energy markets. But we also know that we won’t always get policy design right from the start. Spain is a stark reminder of this. In 2007, Spain introduced ambitious feed-in tariffs that stimulated solar investment. But the scale of the subsidy was seen by some as too expensive, and there was pressure to remove it. When the government drastically reduced the tariff and set a rigid annual capacity cap to limit the number of eligible projects, solar investment collapsed. That is why we need processes to allow us to adapt and improve policy over time while providing the necessary level of predictability to investors.In this regard, one thing that the ADB can do is scale up its efforts to help client countries improve the transparency, inclusiveness and accountability in policy and regulatory processes. This was one of the main conclusions reached at the dialogue on clean energy governance earlier this week.2. Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis is at the Heart of Energy PlanningEven though I am an environmentalist, my next point is about economic cost-benefit analysis. Good economic analysis should be at the heart of energy planning, and at the heart of the ADB’s decisions about which projects and technologies they will support.The problem is that most governments rarely use cost benefit analysis. Even MDBs don’t take economic analysis seriously. I was an economist at the World Bank for nearly a decade and led several cost-benefit studies for major energy and water projects. The incentive was to show that the project met the 12% hurdle rate, what was considered an acceptable rate of return. We never used economic analysis to internalize the full range of environmental and social costs, or to find ways to include non-monetary benefits such as jobs or energy security, or to assess alternatives or options in a meaningful way.I would urge governments and the ADB to rigorously apply economic cost-benefit analysis to help inform the energy policy and investment decisions they take. They should do this in a transparent manner inviting public scrutiny to help test assumptions. Better policies and better investments will emerge from such open, inclusive processes.If the ADB seriously commits to this, it could open up new possibilities and investments for meeting the region’s energy needs.3. Energy Efficiency: The Low-Hanging yet Hard-to-Pick FruitMy third point is about energy efficiency. At this conference we have heard inspiring stories about how much is happening on renewable energy in Asia. By contrast, for all the talk of energy efficiency as a “low hanging fruit,” progress has been slow. A couple of observations emerged during this conference:We need to connect energy efficiency projects with the right kind of financing. There are many groups working on this issue, and there is a need to share ideas on successes and failures as models are explored. One promising idea is to convene a workshop at the next ACEF to help find scalable business models to support the deployment of energy efficiency projects.We need a constituency for energy efficiency at the national and international levels. Right now it does not exist as it does for other industries. This is due in part to the particular characteristics of the energy efficiency sector – it is creating something less (energy savings) rather than something more, which can make it intangible and abstract. The sector is also more fragmented and less visible than other industries. Perhaps we need to help create a coalition of consumers and civil society organizations who have a stake in improving existing energy systems. As we focus on the clean energy revolution, we must not forget that we are still fighting the battle against energy poverty. More than a billion people in this region alone lack access to clean, modern energy services. This is unacceptable. I remain incredibly impressed by the bold policy leadership demonstrated by Asian countries. China and India get lots of attention, but many other countries, notably our host country the Philippines, are taking action as well.I believe that Asia will be the source of low-cost clean energy solutions to the world. As we know, many of the technologies already exist. The problem is that they are still too expensive. Asia leads the world in the concept of frugal innovation. Indian companies, for example, have been leading innovators – they have developed the $2,000 car (the Tata Nano), the $70 refrigerator, and the $30 cataract surgery. Engineering skills and big markets but relatively low purchasing power creates incentives to drive down costs in a radical manner and this fuels incredible innovation. Imagine what could happen if you unleashed that entrepreneurship to focus on renewable energy technologies.When Asian companies see the size of the future market in clean energy, they will, I believe, lead the technological revolution that is needed. This revolution will radically reshape the energy sector in ways that current projections only begin to suggest.I’d like to close with a story that may help inspire the bold political leadership that will be needed if this clean energy revolution is to succeed.A few months ago, US Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner called a meeting with the leaders of the U.S. Climate Action Partnership (USCAP) – a coalition of businesses and environmental organizations that have been instrumental in pushing for mandatory climate legislation in the United States.The meeting, over breakfast, took place in the middle of a severe snowstorm in Washington DC. It was therefore quite small as only a few USCAP members could attend. Secretary Geithner asked Jeff Immelt, the CEO of GE, why he supported mandatory climate legislation and when GE would start seriously investing in the United States again.Immelt replied: “When I look to invest in energy, I look for 3 things”:Scale of potential market: both the U.S. and Asia are at the top of my list;Availability of credit: this is bouncing back in U.S. and already available in Asia;Clear policy: The U.S. does not have clear policies to encourage clean energy. Asia does. We can do a cost-benefit analysis to assess our return on investment in Asia with confidence. Money will flow where risk-adjusted returns are highest. That is not the United States, it is Asia.[!]Note:[/!] Resources and presentations from the 5th Asia Clean Energy Forum are now available online! 4. Energy for All: Financing Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)As we focus on the clean energy revolution, we must not forget that we are still fighting the battle against energy poverty. More than a billion people in this region alone lack access to clean, modern energy services. This is unacceptable.Over the past days, we heard a call for more emphasis on how to support and scale solutions promoted by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The problem is that many of these SMEs lack access to the capital that they need to implement and scale their business ideas. Their financing needs are above the reach of microfinance but below those that attract private equity. This is what ADB President Haruhiko Kuroda referred to as the “missing middle” during his opening speech.The ADB can help lower perceived risks around SMEs and clean energy, through partial loan guarantees to debt funders or patient (long-term) capital to equity funders. This is an important frontier for ADB’s work with its financial intermediary partners throughout the region.5. Reality Check: Country Ownership for Clean EnergyMy final point is about the importance of country ownership. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, Structural Adjustment Lending was popular with the World Bank and the IMF, yet these programs failed in large part because they were never truly owned or supported by the governments on whom conditions were imposed, or their citizens. Though I and many others around the table care deeply about clean energy, we do not want to repeat that same mistake. Clean energy support must be deeply owned within countries. This is the only way we will mobilize the radical and sustained changes needed for a clean energy revolution. Through its work on the Electricity Governance Initiative, WRI has been working with civil society, policymakers and regulators across Asia to improve transparency, inclusiveness and accountability in policy and regulation of the electricity sector.For its part, the ADB needs to proactively engage in-country stakeholders and tailor its clean energy investments to meet their sustainable development needs. Our interventions to support clean energy must respond to the realities of implementation within Asian countries – and the diversity of circumstances and capacities that exist within this region. There is plenty of room for dirty business in clean energy, and so the ADB should emphasize the importance of good electricity governance when it makes its investments.Conclusion: The Time for Political Leadership We need processes to allow us to adapt and improve policy over time while providing the necessary level of predictability to investors. Asia leads the world in the concept of “frugal innovation”… Imagine what could happen if you unleashed that entrepreneurship to focus on renewable energy technologies.last_img read more

College Football’s Longest-Tenured Head Coach Is Retiring

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first_imgThree footballs next to a pylon(Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)The longest-tenured head coach in college football will be retiring following the conclusion of the 2018 season.Jimmye Laycock, who’s been the head coach of his alma mater, William & Mary, since 1980, will be calling it a career after the upcoming season.The 70-year-old head coach reportedly told his team the news on Sunday night.From the Times-Dispatch:This will be Jimmye Laycock’s final season as the football coach at William & Mary, he told his team Sunday night, the eve of the Tribe’s first practice.Laycock, 70, begins his 39th season as coach of his alma mater on Sept. 1, at Bucknell. There is no reason to believe that this decision to leave the job he accepted before the 1980 season was made by anyone other than Laycock.W&M has not designated a successor and is expected to conduct a national search for its next coach.Laycock has compiled a career record of 245-189-2. He released the following statement regarding his decision:“Coaching the William & Mary program is a tremendous honor. I have always taken a great deal of pride in leading my alma mater and have been grateful for the opportunity to work with such tremendous young men. Any success we have had is shared among all the great assistant coaches and the thousands of outstanding student-athletes who have come through our program.“This was obviously a difficult decision, but the time was right to make this announcement. That being said, I can assure you that the coming season has my full attention and preparing this team will have my complete focus.”last_img read more

JCTI to Train 8,000 Workers in Five Years

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first_imgStory Highlights Speaking at the graduation ceremony for the second cohort of certified hospitality workers from the JCTI, held at the Montego Bay Convention Centre on October 17, the Minister emphasised that human capital development is critical to the five-pillar growth agenda of the Ministry, and also plays a key role in helping to boost Jamaica’s tourism product at the highest level of appreciation. Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says the Jamaica Centre for Tourism Innovation (JCTI) is to train some 8,000 tourism workers in the next five years, in an effort to boost the island’s tourism product. In addition, the Minister notes that close to 1,000 persons will be certified by the JCTI by the end of the 2018/2019 financial year. Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says the Jamaica Centre for Tourism Innovation (JCTI) is to train some 8,000 tourism workers in the next five years, in an effort to boost the island’s tourism product.In addition, the Minister notes that close to 1,000 persons will be certified by the JCTI by the end of the 2018/2019 financial year.Speaking at the graduation ceremony for the second cohort of certified hospitality workers from the JCTI, held at the Montego Bay Convention Centre on October 17, the Minister emphasised that human capital development is critical to the five-pillar growth agenda of the Ministry, and also plays a key role in helping to boost Jamaica’s tourism product at the highest level of appreciation.“We are determined that in the shortest possible time, we are going to create a cadre of trained and certified professional workers of our industry that will make it impossible for anyone to say we can find better workers outside of Jamaica,” he said.The Minister emphasised that with the expected increase in hotel rooms in the sector over the next three years, the demand will be high for thousands of trained hospitality workers.Some 250 persons received their JCTI certification on October 17, bringing the total number of persons trained and certified by the JCTI to 350.Among the graduates were 14 certified hospitality educators, nine certified hospitality instructors, 17 culinary tutors, 12 culinarians and pastry chefs, 20 bartender trainers and more than 200 bartenders.They received the American Culinary Federation and the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute (AHLEI) certificates.In the meantime, Minister Bartlett expressed satisfaction at the impact of the JCTI on the tourism sector.“It has been less than a year that the JCTI has been launched and already it is making a huge impact on the sector with an increasing number of hospitality and tourism workers getting on board to be trained and certified as professionals in their fields,” he noted.For his part, Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, applauded the graduates and encouraged them to strive to move to the next level of certification in tourism and hospitality.“What I want for Jamaican young people and workers is that we don’t stop learning, because you need to engage in continuous professional development,” the Minister said.He expressed pleasure that the partnership forged between the tourism and education ministries to provide training and certification for workers in the hospitality sector is “bearing fruit”.The JCTI was created to increase access to certification for recent graduates as well as workers in the industry.last_img read more

California Approves Maritime Emissions Treatment System

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first_imgClean Air Engineering-Maritime (CAEM) has received California Air Resources Board (CARB) approval for the first commercially ready ship emissions capturing system called the Maritime Emissions Treatment System (METS).The METS-1 is CAEM’s first-generation system. It is mounted and deployed from a barge that is positioned alongside ships berthed at the Port of Los Angeles.The system is positioned over vessels’ smoke stacks and captures and treats more than 90 percent of particulate (PM), NOx, SO2, and related diesel pollutants emitted, CAEM says.“In recent years, we have supported development of this technology through our Technology Advancement Program,” said Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Gene Seroka.“With CARB verification approval, this is now a solution that other ports can consider to lower vessel emissions in their harbors and surrounding communities.”METS is the first CARB-approved alternative to “plugging in” to shore-side power — also called cold-ironing or Alternative Maritime Power — which is the current standard for meeting California’s “Airborne Toxic Control Measure for Auxiliary Diesel Engines Operated on Ocean-Going Vessels At-Berth in a California Port” (At-Berth) regulation.Since January 1, 2014, vessel operators not complying with the regulation run the risk of not meeting these emissions standards and being hit with significant fines.“The METS-1 will have an immediate, direct and positive impact on the communities surrounding the Port of Los Angeles and Long Beach,” said Nick Tonsich, CAEM principal.“In the long term, given the fact that there are so many ships in the world’s fleet without cold-ironing capability, the METS system could have a profound impact on the entire shipping industry and our global environment.”More than a decade ago, the Port of Los Angeles pioneered development of Alternative Maritime Power (AMP) for cargo ships. Today, 24 berths at the Port of Los Angeles are equipped for shore power, the most of any port in the world.AMPing at berth eliminates upwards of a ton of NOx emissions per vessel per 24-hour period. Similar results have been demonstrated by the new METS alternative, says CAEM.The CARB testing, which began last year, included performance evaluations of the METS on five separate vessels for a minimum of 200 hours.Partial funding for the METS project came from a USD 1.5 million grant from the Port of Los Angeles’ Technology Advancement Program (TAP) to TraPac, LLC, a container terminal located in the Port of Los Angeles.TraPac contracted with CAEM to conduct research and develop the METS project. TraPac has entered into a service agreement for use of the METS-1 at TraPac on all vessels that are not AMP capable. Provisions in the TAP grant make it possible for the Port of Los Angeles to receive repayment of the grant proceeds.CAEM, which is based in San Pedro, California, has committed to donating all profits from the METS-1 system to local charities that serve the port communities.last_img read more

Halifax garage owner acquitted in death of mechanic burned when van caught

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first_imgHALIFAX — The former owner of a Halifax autobody shop has been acquitted of criminal negligence causing the death of a mechanic who was badly burned when a van suddenly caught fire as he was welding beneath it.The charge was the first in the province under Bill C-45 – also known as the Westray law – which was passed after 26 miners were killed when methane gas ignited in the Nova Scotia mine.Peter Kempton was working under a Dodge Caravan at Your Mechanic Auto Corner in September 2013 when it became engulfed in flames.The 58-year-old suffered second- and third-degree burns over 90 per cent of his body and died the next day in hospital.His boss, shop owner Elie Phillip Hoyeck, was acquitted Friday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court after Justice James Chipman found that Kempton made a series of choices that contributed to his own death.Chipman said the garage had a myriad of safety issues, but none of them led to the poor choices of Kempton, a trained mechanic. Bill C-45 was passed in March 2004, establishing new legal duties for workplace health and safety and imposing tougher penalties for violations that result in injuries or death.The Canadian Presslast_img read more